Business Software Applications

Should your business consider going HTML5 web apps

Many business owners and enterprises are moving to HTML5 web apps including Google which now considers a web site "mobile-friendliness" as a Search ranking signal. HTML5 is considered the underlying technology for "Responsive Web Design". Under this technique your development team designs and builds an app or Web site so it provides the best possible user experience regardless of screen size and/or orientation.

By using "Responsive Web Design" you can basically shrink your website by hiding/adding columns/blocks so that it fits into an smartphone screen or enlarges to fit an iPad or goes back to normal desktop computer view. So one unique website code to fit all screen sizes: 320px width for mobiles to 760px for table to over 1000px for desktop.

There are many reasons why you would consider going HTML5; here we list some of them:

If you are in the app store business targeting both Apple and Google stores: development costs associated to maintaining that native app on 2 different operating systems: iOS, Android are basically doubling your costs. HTML5 might be the answer but that will depend on what kind of app your are developing and if you really native OS support for the functionality.

If you want your corporate/product website to be seen by smartphone browsers: here you really need to go HTML5/CSS3 and make sure your developers follow Google guidelines. Else you are going to miss some additional web traffic. One tip: you would want to revamp your website as part of this effort with the mindset: Mobile first - basically streamline the flow so that your website targets smartphone users and from there work out the desktop version.

If you are in the blogging business: same as previous => go HTML5/CSS3.

If you want to run your app business independent of the Apple or Google stores: basically you want freedom and independence and you don't want to share your revenue with anyone else => go HTML5/CSS3 and develop a web app. But do keep in mind; one thing is for people to find your app in the Apple/Google store which will differ in how people find your app in the world wide web.


Here are some additional articles for reference:

"Web apps are built in standards-based technologies such as HTML5, CSS3 and other modern web tech. Without any special translations, conversions or re-programming, a web app can run on pretty much any platform with a modern, standards-compliant web browser. Once a web app is launched, users on iPhones, iPads, Android phones, the Kindle Fire and Windows Phones can all access the same app and run it just as well as on any other platform."
Source: Native vs HTML5 web apps which is best for you @ July 29, 2014

"There is no clear-cut winner between native and HTML5 apps. Different approaches are appropriate for different situations. Whether you choose to go native or pick HTML5 will depend on your requirements, core expertise, budget, and availability of resources"
Source: Native vs HTML5 apps pros cons @ July 10, 2014

"If you need to deliver an app for the lowest cost at the quickest speed on multiple mobile OS types, a HTML5 app is almost always the preferred way to go. However, if your app needs to make use of device specific hardware, or needs to run very fast, you will do better with a native solution"
Source: HTML5 vs Native Android app @ May 27, 2015

"According to research conducted by technology analyst firm Gartner, there were 102 billion apps downloaded in 2013, resulting in $US26 billion revenue, and $US7 billion of this was paid to app developers"
Source: The great app debate native @ April 16, 2014

"As users increasingly move to mobile and tablet devices instead of desktop computers, delivering a great user experience on smartphones and tablets is essential, and as such, adopting a “mobile-first” strategy seems to be more critical than ever. Both native apps and Web apps can be appropriate for almost any organisation, but this decision should be taken as part of a holistic digital product strategy"
Source: Financial Times weighs in on web vs native app debate @ January 20, 2014

Posted on August 06, 2015